Skip to content ↓

    KS3 Play: Medea

    Bravo! εὖγε!

     

     

    Eerie music plays, two strange figures slowly advance to the middle of a golden circle, their faces transfixed. This was the powerful beginning to the KS3 production of Euripides' Medea, which took the audience on a course of emotional extremes, from light-hearted contemporary references to the profound anguish of a woman abandoned in a foreign land. The two figures, it turns out, are Medea's sons, soon to be used as a weapon to wreak revenge and destruction on Medea's ex-husband Jason. A play that has toyed with ideas of feminism and asylum since its inception was reinvigorated for the modern stage with themes that, in some cases, seem to have barely changed in 2500 years.

     

    The chorus was the bedrock of the performance, with tight-knit ensemble work that showcased students' talents in drama, singing and dance. They represented the girls of Corinth, who throughout the play grapple with Medea's feelings and often don't really 'get' her - attempting to interpret her message through modern references from Gloria Gaynor to Taylor Swift, Donald Trump to Syrian refugees. As they did also in ancient productions, they speak both profound wisdom and shallow chatter.

     

    Brilliantly mature interpretations from Chanya 9M (Medea), Mia 9C (Jason), Mahfuza 9C (Kreon) and Georgia 9C (Aegeus) culminated in scenes of strong and convincing conflict, underscored by the telling silence from Medea's two sons (played by Evie 9R and Rafaela 7R).

     

    Outstanding performances from the whole cast were backed up by a remarkably collaborative and skilful off-stage team, including lighting and sound crew and live band, as well as costume and set designers, stage hands and various artistic advisors and helpers over the course of the last few months. Altogether over 100 people were involved in this fantastic play. The greatest appreciation and congratulations go to Mr Lundholm who adapted the text and co-ordinated the whole production.

    Bravo! εὖγε!

     

    Mr Bateson
    Head of Classics